The fallout from the IR35 roll-out so far

The fallout from the IR35 roll-out so far.

After much conjecture and a twelve-month deferral, the IR35 Off-Payroll Reforms have finally been introduced into the private sector.

For those businesses that utilise personal service company (PSC) contractors, the responsibility for assessing whether contractors’ assignments fall inside or outside of the IR35 legislation now falls on them.

Not only is this a change in responsibility for businesses that engage PSCs, but it also comes with an increased possibility of financial liability, should they get it wrong.

So what are the initial reactions following the implementation of the IR35 Reforms?

IR35 – Prepared and ready?

The IR35 Reforms have been much publicised following their introduction to the public sector in 2017. Add in the COVID induced deferral, and businesses have had plenty of time to assess and prepare for the private sector reforms.

However, despite months of advice and guidance from hundreds of sources and angles, predictions and warnings have transpired, and we have seen both engagers and fee payers ill-prepared for the changes.

So far, we have witnessed and heard of cases where engagers of tens, hundreds, and even thousands of contractors have done nothing to prepare for the introduction of the IR35 reforms and not even issued a status determination statement (SDS). 

Alternatively, we have observed many engagers take a broad-brush approach and introduce “no PSC” policies or, more worryingly, make blanket “inside IR35” assessments.

In other cases, we have observed engagers taking the minimal actions possible to assess the contractors. Notably, we have heard of some engagers advising their contractors to conduct their own self-assessment by completing the HMRC’s Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) test and feeding back results to obtain a status determination.

Whilst we have also witnessed some excellent IR35 work and preparation with some engagers, the volume of stories we have heard or witnessed regarding a lack of preparation is hugely concerning.

What are the implications of poor preparation and bad practice?

Reassuringly, before the implementation of the IR35 Reforms, HMRC announced that the reforms would get a “light touch” introduction, advising that genuine mistakes will go unpunished for the first 12 months following the introduction.

However, engagers should not interpret this approach as an excuse not to take action.

HMRC have issued regular updates over the last two years outlining their expectations of engagers following the reforms, and a lack of preparation is unlikely to be considered sympathetically.

So what are the possible consequences of poor preparation or a lack of action?

Consequences

Valid Status Determination Statements

The IR35 changes state that the engager must make a valid status determination and take reasonable care in doing so. The status determination is required to ensure that the correct taxes and deductions can be calculated and made per the legislation.

If the client fails to issue an SDS or take reasonable care, the responsibility for the deduction of tax and NICs, and the payment of the apprenticeship levy and paying these to HMRC will rest with it. That liability will always remain with the client unless it takes reasonable care in reaching its conclusion set out in the SDS.

Failure to take reasonable care is unlikely to be deemed a genuine error by HMRC and will therefore induce fines and penalties from day one.

Blanket Statements

Making blanket statements is also classified by HMRC as not taking reasonable care, meaning that this approach would also render the engager liable for deductions and penalties where errors occur.

The blanket statement approach is also likely to make the engager less attractive to those contractors seeking assignments outside of IR35, reducing their chances of attracting top talent, meeting work schedules or achieving project milestones.

The potential for reputational damage to the engager as a supplier or employer of choice is significant.

Determination test tools

HMRC released its Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool some time ago, but this has proved inconclusive for many assessments, even in some of HMRC’s own test cases.

Simply directing contractors to conduct their own assessments using the CEST tool is unlikely to meet reasonable care requirements and offers no guarantee against incorrect assessments. 

Again, the responsibilities and liabilities for engagers taking this approach could be severe.

IR35 – avoid the risks

Engagers should not underestimate the benefits of having a defined, robust and compliant process for IR35 assessment.

Those prepared to invest in some simple processes and procedures can quickly and easily mitigate the risks posed by the new legislation.

If you’re looking for help to develop a compliant process or simply keen to maintain best-practice and BAU moving forward – we have plenty more observations to share from the past few weeks.

To learn more about the good, the bad, and the ugly, as well as advice on what Engagers and Recruitment Agencies can do pretty quickly to attract and retain talent whilst adhering to the legislation. You can access a recording of our most recent webinar here – Expectation vs Reality: The Fallout Of The IR35 Roll-Out So Far

Alternatively, for a free, no-obligation audit and assessment of your IR35 compliance process, you can speak directly with Andy Webster, Founder and Director, Workr Compliance, on 07827 810851 or at aw@workrgroup.com.




Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

Workr Group Boost Contractor Numbers with Latest Acquisition

Workr Group, a leading international provider of employment, payroll and accountancy services to engagers of temporary workers, has acquired the contractor book of PayCo Services.

PayCo Services is also an established and respected provider of employment, payroll and accounting services. It was founded in 2005 and maintains an excellent reputation with its contractors and agency clients.

Matt Tyson, Group CEO at Workr Group, said the move was a significant boost to three of the group’s areas of expertise; umbrella, self-employed and international. Two of the existing PayCo services staff transferred across to support the existing Workr Group team managing the increased volume in contractor and agency relationships.

Matt said; “We have known and admired the team at PayCo Services for some time. The move is aligned to our strategy to grow our existing service lines both organically and through acquisition.”

Matt added; “Our initial focus has been on providing a smooth transition and personalised service to the contractors and demonstrating the added value and enhanced benefits they now receive.”

“At the same time we have been talking to our new agency partners. Our additional breadth of service offerings has really resonated as has our FCSA and APSCo accreditations and the increased security and compliance this affords them”

Workr Group was represented by Fieldfisher LLP and supported by Beever and Struthers for financial and tax due diligence.

Terms of the deal have not been disclosed.


Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

Workr Group Makes a Hat-trick of Promotions

L to R: A Hat-trick of Promotions – Ashley McClure, Beth Robinson, and Chris Timms

Workr Group is delighted to announce a trio of key promotions to strengthen their client offerings taking effect immediately. 

In the sales team Ashley McClure has been promoted to an Account Director whilst Beth Robinson has become a Senior Relationship Manager. Their roles are focussed on finding new ways to drive client success by combining the Group’s services in unique ways to meet client specific requirements. 

Chris Timms has been promoted to Associate Director, IT. Chris was already a member of the Senior Leadership Team and his promotion gives him formal oversight and responsibility for Group-wide IT operations. 

All newly formed roles sit at a Workr Group level and have been created through a demand from existing clients looking to consolidate their supply chain and connect the breadth of our service offering under one roof. 

Mike Lee, Group Sales Director at Work Group commented on the moves: “We are really excited to have Ashley, Beth and Chris in their new roles, their successes with the business to date have led to their promotions. Both Ashley and Beth deserve to be recognised for their hard work in building, maintaining and growing our existing client base. Chris has an ability to understand and translate not only our internal IT requirements but that of our clients needs. Working together, and drawing from their collective experience, we are confident we will continue to find new technologies and solutions to support our clients growth.”

McClure, Account Director at Workr Group commented: ‘Workr Group has been such a fantastic environment for me to progress in my career and I have been lucky to work across such a robust network of clients, delivering a wide array of services with a uniquely talented group of colleagues. Since I joined the business over two years ago, my client and exposure has grown significantly which has really solidified my understanding of the requirements of each sector we work with.”

Lee added: “Ash, Beth and Chris have already been integral in creating the right mix of people, process and technology that allows us to connect our excellence across our service offerings. Their promotions will be seen as a natural progression by our team and our clients and will help fuel our continued business growth.”

Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

Read More

Workr Group Announces Team Expansion

L to R: Workr welcome four new recruits – Jess Hall, Elizabeth Nyka, Katie Byrom, and Alex Jones

The Workr Group, a leading international specialist in outsourced employment and accountancy services, has expanded its UK team with four new recruits amid organic business expansion. 

The new recruits have joined the business in April to strengthen both the sales and customer experience teams based out of their UK Headquarters in Manchester. It follows hot on the heels of the appointment of Harry Stacey in March as a regional Client Relationship Director based in Bristol.

Alex Jones, Jess Hall, Elizabeth Nyka and Katie Byron have been busy undertaking a comprehensive induction programme, covering all facets of the Workr Group. Over the coming weeks the newcomers will continue their on-boarding with role-relevant training on client-specific processes and procedures. 

Mike Lee, Director at Workr Group commented ‘We have seen an increase in existing clients looking to consolidate their supply chain and connect the breadth of our service offering under one roof. This, combined with recent new business wins, has prompted the need for fresh talent. Alex, Jess, Elizabeth and Katie join our existing teams to ensure we can continue to deliver at the scale our clients need whilst providing best-in-class service levels. We look forward to seeing the impact their on-going contributions will bring to the Group and supporting each of them in their continued professional and personal development.’

Gareth Murphy, Customer Experience Manager at Workr Group commented ‘We are delighted to welcome our new recruits into the agency. We placed a greater weight on character attributes such as otivation, curiosity, and determination to assess each candidate’s future potential and their adaptability to our company and to our clients’ business environments. It is great to see our efforts come to fruition as we welcome these new starters to the business. We look forward to watching them grow and prosper.”

Lee added ‘Organic business growth and changes to the way the contractor population can be paid will mean we continue to have a strong focus on our recruitment efforts in the coming months. This ensures we have the people, the infrastructure and the capability to deliver the services clients need, as they need them. 

Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

Read More

Expectation vs Reality: The Fallout Of The IR35 Roll-Out So Far

With the deadline behind us, we’re finally starting to see the ramifications of preparing – or failing to prepare – coming to fruition for engagers and fee payers. Join Workr Compliance and STR Group at 4pm on Wednesday, 5th May for a review of the last few weeks, and key advice for maintaining BAU in the months ahead….

Hosted by Andrew Webster, Founder and Director at Workr Compliance, who will be joined by David James, Engineering Programme Director at STR Group and former IR35 Project Lead at WORLEY, this session will provide actionable insights on:

  1. Continuation of assessing PSCs
  2. Audit of the IR35 programme
  3. Upskilling of new Managers
  4. IR35 legislation updates

The prediction and warnings have transpired; we have seen both Engagers and Fee Payers ill prepared for the changes despite months of advice and guidance from all angles. Whether you’re one of them – or simply keen to maintain best practice and BAU moving forward – we have plenty of observations to share from the past few weeks.

Join us for insights on the good, the bad and the ugly, as well as advice on what Engagers and Recruitment Agencies can do pretty quickly, to attract and retain talent whilst adhering to the legislation…

NOTE: If you cannot attend live on the day, you can still register to receive a free recording after the session.

Missed it? View the webinar recording

  • The password protected webinar recording is available here. Complete this form to receive a password.

    Please see our privacy notice for more information but where your enquiry may include Personal Data please confirm your consent to the use and storage of that data by the Workr Group for the purposes of your specific enquiry as Opted-In below, over and above any legal obligations we may have to store and process your data. You may at any time withdraw your consent by notifying our Data Protection Officer at dpo@workrgroup.com or by using the specific online form.

Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

Read More

IR35 – April 2021 and beyond

It’s now almost 12 months since the IR35 Off-Payroll Reforms were due to take effect.

Many businesses had invested time and money into preparations for the 6th April 2020 with collaborations, new systems and updated procedures only for the legislation to be deferred due to the pandemic.

With the reforms now in play, what should businesses be doing, and what should business as usual look like?

IR35 – Prepared and ready?

With the IR35 reforms now in effect, businesses still preparing can take some solace in HMRC’s announcement about a “light touch” introduction. Whilst it is imperative that businesses take action, genuine mistakes will go unpunished for the first 12 months following the introduction.

In a previous article, IR35 —  deferred, not defunct! Workr Group outlined the changes in responsibilities for engagers and recommendations on what HMRC expects from engagers concerning processes and responsibilities. Now that the reforms are in effect, engagers should be doing the following:

Status Determination Statement (SDS)

The IR35 changes state that the engager must make a status determination and take reasonable care in doing so. The status determination is required to ensure that the correct taxes and deductions can be calculated and made in accordance with the legislation.

According to HMRC’s Employment Status Manual (ESM10013), a valid Status Determination Statement must:-

  • state in the SDS whether or not the worker would be an employee or office holder, or is an office holder, for tax and NICs purposes if they were directly engaged by the client,
  • provide their reasons for coming to that conclusion, and
  • have taken reasonable care in coming to their conclusion (see ESM10014)

It is essential for engagers to note HMRC’s stance regarding reasonable care as follows:-

“If the client fails to take reasonable care, the responsibility for the deduction of tax and NICs, and the payment of the apprenticeship levy and paying these to HMRC will rest with it. That liability will always remain with the client unless it takes reasonable care in reaching its conclusion set out in the SDS.”

Reasonable Care

By reasonable care, HMRC means that the status determination must be thorough and detailed, giving an accurate and clear representation of the work to be carried out by the contractor (worker). 

HMRC recommends that you formalise and record a consistent process, seek professional advice and assistance, involve relevant parties or individuals, use a determination test tool and define and communicate a transparent process for challenges.

Determination test tools

HMRC released its Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool some time ago, but this has proved inconclusive for many assessments, even in some of HMRC’s own test cases.

However, suppliers in the industry have constructed several other tests using case law examples, representing credible CEST alternatives.

Insurance

Many engagers who want to continue to utilise contractors have stipulated a need for IR35 insurance within the supply chain.

A comprehensive insurance policy that supports a robust determination process should eliminate almost all liability from engagers and put them in a prime position to attract the best contractor talent for those assignments identified as outside of the legislation.

Challenge process

Contractors and agency suppliers must have the opportunity to challenge an assessment, whether inside or outside of IR35.

Failure to consider or respond to an SDS challenge will likely be regarded as a lack of reasonable care by HMRC. This would significantly increase the risk of liability should HMRC find an assessment to be incorrect.

6th of April 2021 and beyond – Business As Usual (BAU)

Businesses should not underestimate the benefits of having a defined, robust and documented process for IR35 assessment.

Engagers prepared to invest in some simple processes and procedures, along with the support of compliant suppliers, can quickly and easily mitigate the risks posed by the new legislation and meet HMRC’s requirements.

As with any other supply chain for products or services, some good due diligence and common sense will allow businesses to carry on with business as usual, utilising contractors effectively and productively.

In contrast to businesses that have changed policies or made blanket statements, engagers will benefit most from the choice of exceptional contract talent available to them due to their fair and credible approach to IR35.

IR35 – Act now!

We encourage anyone with a responsibility for IR35 compliance to ensure that your determination process is fit for purpose and meets HMRC’s reasonable care requirements. To learn more about this you can join Workr Compliance and STR Group at 4pm on Wednesday, 5th May for a webinar reviewing the landscape post 6th April and to gain key advice for maintaining BAU in the months ahead. 

If you are unable to make the webinar our specialist team can provide impartial advice and support to help you meet your reasonable care responsibilities. For a free, no-obligation audit and assessment of your IR35 compliance process, you can speak directly with Andy Webster on 07827 810851 or at aw@workrgroup.com.


Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

IR35 reforms to get a gentle introduction

With IR35 Off Payroll Private Sector Reforms coming into effect on the 6th April 2021, HMRC has confirmed what it describes as a soft landing for affected parties for the first 12 months following implementation.

As businesses prepare with procedures and assessments in readiness for the reforms, they can take some solace from HMRC’s recent publication pledging its support for parties affected.

For the twelve months following implementation, HMRC has confirmed that it will take a “light-touch approach” to penalties. The publication goes on to state, “customers will not have to pay penalties for inaccuracies in the first 12 months relating to the off-payroll working rules, regardless of when the inaccuracies are identified, unless there’s evidence of deliberate non-compliance.

HMRC support

With effect from the 6th April 2021, the responsibility for IR35 determination will shift from the contractor to the engager. To help support this transition, HMRC established a specialist team and created an educational programme for all parties affected by the change.

The light-touch approach to penalties and commitment not to investigate returns for years before 2021/2022 has reassured parties that there will, at least, be a reasonable period for adaptation. See our recent blog, IR35 – Soft landings and support for a more detailed overview.

It’s reasonable to assume, therefore, that HMRC is expecting teething problems.

Concerning mistakes, HMRC states that “a mistake for the purposes of the off-payroll working rules may mean that you have not met some or all of your responsibilities, or have paid more or less tax and NICs than is due.” 

“Mistakes can include payments being made to contractors without the correct deductions being made or making inaccurate employment status determinations.”

The focus here seems quite clear; make reasonable and accurate determinations and make the relevant and correct deductions appropriate to the determination.

HMRC has encouraged businesses to be vigilant and self-police their IR35 procedures, committing to supporting and assisting businesses who identify and admit mistakes once identified. In response, HMRC has said that they will work closely with engagers and agencies to understand and identify how the mistake has been made and support them to rectify any errors without imposing penalties.

While this approach may seem reasonable and supportive from HMRC, the added scrutiny and attention it may bring may not be quite as welcome. 

Reasonable care and compliance

It is unclear as yet as to how HMRC will approach governance and compliance as a whole.

RTI requirements already provide them with much of the information required to understand where the larger contractor populations reside. It would seem likely that HMRC will look first to those areas where they believe there is a higher risk of non-compliance or avoidance.

We believe this will be the root of HMRC’s approach. Tax avoidance and deliberate non-compliance will most likely be the key issues that HMRC will want to expose and eradicate.

There may be some “heat” for organisations where mistakes occur but, for those businesses trying to do the right thing, a sensible and documented approach should be more than enough to satisfy HMRC’s requirements.

Where engagers take reasonable care in their determination process and where mistakes occur, take reasonable steps to avoid repeat or new errors, it’s reasonable to assume that HMRC will focus their efforts elsewhere.

Get it right first time

Whilst HMRC has committed to a soft touch introduction, the risk and liability for getting things wrong remain.

Organisations in the supply chain have already seen an increase in the administrative burden due to the changes. They are unlikely to welcome any additional scrutiny as a result of an HMRC investigation.

The easiest way to avoid this scenario is to get the process right first time!

It’s not too late, but with time quickly running out before the 6th April introduction, organisations need to act decisively to ensure that they have taken reasonable care in their approach to compliance. To avoid any risk of complicity in tax avoidance schemes, they must also have absolute confidence in their supply chain.

To help meet your reasonable care responsibilities concerning IR35 compliance and tax avoidance schemes, Workr Groups specialist team can provide impartial advice and support in preparation for the reforms.

For a free, no-obligation audit and assessment of your IR35 compliance process, you can speak directly with Andy Webster, Founder and Director, Workr Compliance, on 07827 810851 or at aw@workrgroup.com


Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

HMRC rectifies conditions of liability oversight in readiness for IR35 changes

Last year, HMRC made some minor last-minute changes to the Finance Act 2020 in preparation for the implementation of the IR35 reforms.

Without seeking consultation from sector stakeholders, HMRC amended the conditions of liability (COL) for a company intermediary in an attempt to prevent avoidance of the off-payroll working rules.

By reducing their shareholding to less than 5%, workers providing their services via an intermediary would remove the conditions of liability required for the off-payroll working rules to apply.

Therefore, the government felt it necessary to close this loophole by clarifying the conditions of a company intermediary.

Changes went beyond the intended scope

Whilst wholly unintended, the subsequent changes made to the Finance Act 2020 extended the scope of the conditions for an intermediary. In the words of the government, the changes “went beyond the intended scope of the policy”.

Different intermediaries such as partnerships or incorporated limited companies have different conditions of liability. In the original IR35 legislation, the intermediary conditions of liability stipulated that the worker must hold a material interest (5% or more) in the intermediary.

The legislation also required the worker to disclose to the engager that it held a material interest in the intermediary. Where the worker failed to provide the information, the engager was to assume that the worker held a material interest.

However, whilst the material interest condition remained the same, HMRC added two further conditions as follows;

Where the worker receives a chain payment.

Or

Where the worker is entitled to receive a chain payment.

When strictly applied, these added conditions meant that any worker providing services via an intermediary where a chain payment is received would fall within the scope of the legislation. The unintended consequences being that some self-employed or even employed workers would fall within the scope of the legislation.

HMRC announced a commitment to addressing this oversight on the 12th of November 2020. On 3rd March 2021, HMRC published a policy paper stating that the scope of this condition was wider than the policy intent. It confirmed that it would have caught any arrangement where the worker operates through a company, even if the full payment had already been taxed as employment income (such as where the worker is operating as an employee of an umbrella company).

Operating as intended

Having published its policy paper, HMRC confirmed its intention to amend the conditions of liability again to limit the scope of the condition to cases as follows;

Where the worker holds a material interest.

Or

Where the worker holds less than a material interest in the intermediary and the payment received by the worker for the services provided is not already taxed wholly as employment income.

Additionally, HMRC has extended the requirement to confirm whether the conditions of an intermediary are met to the intermediary as well as the worker. The change is intended to make it easier for parties in the supply chain to confirm whether the worker is potentially subject to the IR35 off-payroll working rules.

The provision of fraudulent information was also extended to any UK-based party in the labour supply chain, rather than just the worker or someone connected to them. This is aimed at preventing deemed employers from facing a liability where they have been provided with fraudulent information by another party in the chain.

 

Subscribe to the Workr newsletter to hear updates as they happen

 

We are currently awaiting the confirmed wording of the technical changes and will provide an update once published.

For queries regarding the above technical changes or any other IR35 related issues, Workr Group has a specialist IR35 team that can support and advise you.

You can speak directly with Andy Webster, Founder and Director, Workr Compliance, on 07827 810851 or at aw@workrgroup.com.


Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.

IR35 – Soft landings and support

With no mention in the budget, and following its latest update on the IR35 Off Payroll Private Sector Reforms, HMRC has all but confirmed that the reforms would come into effect on the 6th April 2021.

Confirming what it describes as a soft landing for affected parties for the first 12 months following implementation, HMRC emphasised compliance and support in its update.

In essence, this means that HMRC will take a lenient approach with parties where they believe genuine mistakes are made during the process. For the twelve months to the 5th April 2022, HMRC states that it will not issue penalties where it deems the error genuine. It will, however, still pursue any perceived outstanding tax liabilities.

Soft landings and support

IR35, also known as the Intermediaries Legislation, is tax legislation aimed at tackling tax avoidance. 

The earnings of workers providing their services and expertise to a client via an intermediary, such as a limited company or personal service company, are subject to income tax and National Insurance Contributions (NIC’s) if caught by IR35.

With the responsibility for IR35 determination shifting from the contractor to the engager once the reforms take effect, HMRC has established a specialist team and created an educational programme in preparation for the changes.

Emphasising its desire to ensure that people pay the correct taxes through education and support, HMRC has confirmed that it will take a “light touch” approach to penalties in the first twelve months following the implementation of the IR35 changes.

In its policy paper, issued on the 15th February 2021, HMRC stated: “You will not have to pay penalties for inaccuracies relating to the off-payroll working rules in the first 12 months of the operation of the new rules unless there’s evidence of deliberate non-compliance.”

HMRC also went on to confirm that “We have also committed that we will not use information acquired as a result of the changes to the off-payroll working rules to open a new compliance enquiry into returns for tax years before 2021 to 2022, unless there is reason to suspect fraud or criminal behaviour.”

Compliance and anti-avoidance

Whilst these commitments will re-assure those parties concerned with prior years investigations and ambiguity around determination processes, we still urge parties to proceed with caution.

Implementing a specialist team is a clear indicator of HMRC’s determination to tackle tax avoidance and compliance.

In publishing its compliance principles, HMRC clearly states its support for those customers trying to do the right thing and complying with the rules, which we interpreted as taking reasonable care, following guidance and enlisting professional help where required.

It was also clear in its approach to tax avoidance and non-compliance. HMRC committed to challenging deliberate non-compliance and schemes that claim to avoid the off-payroll working rules or otherwise reduce the tax payable.

For those engagers or other organisations in the supply chain who fail to take reasonable care or comply with the legislation, the landing may not be quite as soft as it sounds.

Does a soft landing mean no financial risk?

Absolutely not.

By soft landing, HMRC means that it won’t financially penalise organisations for genuine mistakes. However, it will still pursue any unpaid taxes through the supply chain if a mistake is made.

With time quickly running out before the 6th April introduction, organisations need to act decisively to ensure that they have taken reasonable care in their approach to compliance. To avoid any risk of complicity in tax avoidance schemes, they must also have absolute confidence in their supply chain.

To help meet your reasonable care responsibilities concerning IR35 compliance and tax avoidance schemes, Workr Groups specialist team can provide impartial advice and support in preparation for the reforms.

Engagers or end users can find out more by registering for our free webinar on the 11th March 2021 via the following link:

Use the link to access a free recording if you can’t make the date.

Alternatively, you can speak directly with Andy Webster, Founder and Director, Workr Compliance, on 07827 810851 or at aw@workrgroup.com.


Our staff regularly write about subjects that interest them in ways that will interest our clients. Sign up to our newsletter and receive notifications when new content is added.